Indonesia is one of the most diverse countries in Asia

Indonesia is one of the most diverse countries in Asia, with over 800 million people. The country has been running on an agricultural base for decades now and it’s still very much present throughout many aspects life here – from cooking your meals at home or buying food off a truck pedicab style all way up through cultivating rice paddies during sweltering heat waves back when we were cooler!

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The Qatar agricultural sector is booming

Qatar is a country rich in natural resources with 99% of its population living within urban areas. TheQatari economy relies heavily on food imports to feed 2 million people, who experience hot summers and harsh winters due their lack or precipitation throughout the year (there are only about 28 thousand ha that can be used for agriculture). environmental conditions here include sparse rainfall which often comes during extreme weather events like hurricanes alike; high temperatures combined together high humidity levels makes it very uncomfortable especially when they occur at once rather than individually .

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The agricultural sector in Qatar

The small country of Qatar is one-of the wealthiest in all Asia and has been making efforts to become even more self sufficient. It’s cuisine relies heavily on imported ingredients such as vegetables, dairy products (including eggs) meat from animals like sheep or cows but they have been able produce these goods locally thanks primarily due an increase their production by 20% since mid 2017; this trend should continue with further increases expected through 2020!

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Germany is an agriculture and food superpower

Germany has a rich and diverse agricultural industry. In the flat land of northern Germany, such as Schleswig-Holstein or Brandenburg where there are few hills to climb for electricity generation purposes; cereals like barley grow well on these arable lands with enough rain fall throughout winter months because they store large amounts water within their stems which then becomes nutritious grain once digested by animals later consumed at harvest time during summer season when feed is scarce (this process helps explain why people think beer tastes better after eating some!).

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Kenya is a leading producer of tea and coffee

As agriculture dominates the economy in Kenya, 15 to 17 percent of all land is suitable for farming. 7–8% can be classified as first-class which makes it a prime spot that has adequate fertility and rainfall throughout its territory making this an attractive option when choosing one’s livelihood or way of life.

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The grain industry in South Africa is a major player on the agricultural scene

Agriculture in South Africa contributes around 5% of formal employment, relatively low compared to other parts of Africa and the number is still decreasing. With an arid climate that can only support 13-15% for crop production on its agricultural lands (outright or potential), it’s not surprising this industry accounts for 2%.

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Agriculture plays an integral role in the lives of Zimbabweans

Agriculture plays an integral role in the lives of Zimbabweans, whether they are rural or urban dwellers. For many people living on farms and spread across different regions throughout this country there is not always enough food for everyone so it’s important that more can be grown locally with support from state-run agencies like Agriculture Zimbabwe .

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Rice is an essential part of the Malaysian diet

Malaysia is a country in Southeast Asia with over twelve percent of GDP coming from agriculture. Sixteen percent or more than one-quarter population are employed through this sector, and there have been many changes since British settlers arrived to establish large scale plantations for rubber trees (1876), palm oil production starting up just prior World War I when it became an attractive alternative energy source because natural resources were scarce due prevent conflict happening again) , cocoa growing rapidly after 1950 following economic growth throughout much if not all East Asian countries at that time).

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